Author Topic: Tomino's Hell  (Read 167 times)

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Tomino's Hell
« on: November 09, 2019, 09:36:40 AM »

For many prayers, curses, magic spells and rituals, a few words must be heard to make them happen.


     This is a popular Japanese story, it is about a poem called "Tomino's Hell." They say that you should only read with your mind, and never out loud. If you were to read it out loud, then you must take responsibility for your actions. According to the legend, if you read this poem out loud, disaster will strike. At best, you will feel very ill or injure yourself. At worst, you could die. 
     "Tomino's Hell" is written by Yomota Inuhiko in a book called "The Heart is Like a Rolling Stone", And was included in Saizo Yaso's 27th collection of poems in 1919.

     The meaning of the poem is up to interpretation, but the most common summary is that a boy named Tomino is in love with his younger sister and loses his soul. With the loss of his soul, Tomino descends into Hell, which may be a metaphor for war. His older sister encourages him to win the war as she spits up blood. His younger sister does the same while spitting up fire. Tomino, presented to still be young and innocent, throws his life away for the cause. He cries for his younger sister as he travels through the seven valleys of Hell. Tomino eventually reaches the eighth level, which is the most painful. He suffers more with each passing level. There are also certain items on Tomino's clothing and different hints throughout the poem that relate the story back to the battlefield of WWII. The story ends with Tomino dying in battle, never to return to his family.

     You can find the poem easily on the internet, but we are not sure if it is the true poem or if its power may have weakened over time through the words being exchanged.


(This picture has nothing to do with the poem. Check here for more infos: Here)

« Last Edit: November 09, 2019, 11:01:35 AM by Administrator »